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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
the world's first true world war. his attack on the french in the western pennsylvania wilderness grew into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britai
in the wilderness represent a majority of rank-and-file voters. the first that i alluded to that many on the right don't understand that properly understood gay-rights are compatible with fundamental principles and the essence of the libertarian philosophy is one of louis and let live people are concerned with unalienable rights. the government does that give those rights depended on your religion, economic class, a gender, or theoretically your sexual orientation. that is the way it is supposed to be. some libertarians already get that who have a special obligation to te
chicken, some neck. >> rose: when, back to '93, '40, when he had been in the wilderness, 29, and had seen the coming of hitler and argued passionately within the counsel of government. how was that received at that time? >> well, in the middle of the 30s he was regarded as a real nuisance because he was talking about hitler but he was also making a fuss about other issues about india, all the an by-- abdication in which he was felt to be way out on opinions. and the feeling is winston is making a fuss because he wants to get back into office. by 38y, 39y, particularly after munich there is a strong sense, actually, although winston is a nuisance he's right on the fundamental thing. and he is the great advantage for churchill is that when war comes, he is in a position of not having been tainted. he's not got dirty hands. he has a really clear record. can speak with authority. and there is an overwhelming desire to see him back in government. >> and he manages an extraordinary passage for the british parliament because there was this growing unease, particularly after munich, so many peopl
boyfriend in the snowy wilderness talks about her ordeal after these messages. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. we're for the individual. the food lover. the movie lover. the road tripper. and the music mentor. ♪ we're for the gamer. the play maker. the page turner. and the up-all-nighters. so when we set out to make a smart phone we didn't make one for all of us. we made one for each of us. new windows phone. reinvented around you. we made one for each of us. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your
-disappearing animal in madagascar, the plowshare tortoise, whose shrinking habitat is so deep in the wilderness, it's only accessible by boat. >> goode: this tortoise is one of the world's most endangered animals. it is the world's most endangered tortoise. and it has an incredibly high price on its head. asian countries love gold and this is a gold tortoise. and so literally, these are like gold bricks that one can pick up and sell. >> stahl: we were following the path the poachers take, landing on a deserted beach, and off we went on a long hike. we walked through scrub brush in blazing heat for almost an hour. >> goode: if the sun gets too high up, they just disappear. >> stahl: the once plentiful plowshare population here, he says, could be down to as few as 300 adults. >> goode: and this is where the guards are based. >> stahl: goode has helped hire around 40 locals to go out and find the tortoises before the poachers do. >> angelo: we have to be on a team of many people. >> goode: different lines, 30 feet apart. >> angelo: yeah. >> goode: all right, let's go. >> stahl: we lined up the way pol
of order" and tlc's "breaking amish" have also focused on the wilder side of amish life. >> it a controversial concept, and reality feeds on controversy. it's outrageous. it's mysterious. it's unexpected. >> reporter: the network's website acknowledges most of the show is re-enactments, but according to levi, all the stories are the god's honest truth. linsey davis, abc news, new york. >> hope you caught that last word re-enactment. so you're not actually watching it. but they insist the stories are true. but you're not actually watching it unfold. >> it's reality, it's rob's reality with lebanon levi in your household, isn't it? >> that's what i'm talking about. now we're talking. >> who are you paying for a hit? who are you taking out? >> taking out willis, clearly. he's talking trash about the giants/saints game. >> i would just like an italian sausage, please. did you see the sign? i'm hungry. >>> when we -- when we come back, he's back in "the skinny." >> coming up on "world news now." ♪ >>> willis is back. can you tell? >>> willis is back. can you tell? here we g
plans to turn the land into a marine wilderness area, and as a result, the oyster company and 30 employees are out of work. kevin is the owner of drake's bay and now suing for an injunction to keep his business open. good morning to you, kevin. >> good morning, gretchen. how are you? >> gretchen: doing just fine. thank you for getting up so early. so tell me what you've been doing for all these years, your oyster farm. >> the oyster farm is really kind of a main stay in our community. we produce about a third of the oysters grown in the state of california. we get about 50,000 visitors a year who love this place, been here for over eight decades and the community and our county and san francisco bay area loves ush washington, d.c. >> gretchen: so the interior department wants to shut you down. why? >> well, actually a small handful of folks who are really wilderness activists who care deeply about getting people off the land, i think is the best we can tell, want to give up something to create a humanless landscape and it's a little strange because national sea shore was created
with the antics of "jersey shore." but it's set in the heartland. and in possible, it's wilder than its predecessors. paula faris has a sneak peek. >> reporter: this is the story of nine friends. who stopped being polite. and start getting -- >> buck wild. whatever happens, happens. >> reporter: mtv's latest reality tv spectacle follows a group of friends letting loose southern style. think "jersey shore." meets "honey boo boo." after the shore house crew leaves the air in two weeks, they'll be replaced by the gang on "buck wild." instead of fist-bumping and gtl, it's mudding and atvs. >> i don't have a facebook. i don't have none of that internet stuff. >> they live this outdoor lifestyle that's really free. and it's indearing and invigorating. >> reporter: "buck wild" will have plenty of drunken partying and relationship drama. >> i'm going to be me. >> reporter: just with a dixie twist. >> this is the age of the southern crazy character. there's no question about it. >> reporter: from "honey boo boo" from "toddler & tiaras." to "swamp people," "buck wild" is the latest of country-fri
, but not these particular people. and, in fact, the gossip was much wilder than the reality. he had a--it was said that he built the lying-in hospital in new york to take care of all the pregnancies that he was responsible. c-span: lying-in? >> guest: lying-in is a maternity hospital. we don't use that term anymore, although in boston it's still called the boston lying-in. he did actually build that hospital, but there was a less-lurid explanation. his best friend and physician was a man named james w. markoe, who was an obstetrician, and he wanted to build a hospital that would give up-to-date, first-class care to poor women who couldn't afford it. and morgan gave them $1 million to build the hospital and gave $100,000 to it for the rest of his life, which is not what we think of about j.p. morgan, that he was helping poor women have children under the best possible circumstances. c-span: did you spend 15 years on this one subject? >> guest: on j. p. morgan? c-span: yes. c-span: yes. >> guest: yes. but it isn't one subject, it's about 30. c-span: but this one book. >> guest: yes, this one book took me 15
to hold on a little wilder. and we probably wouldn't mind being in our 20s starting over, because that generation of writers, students of mine, will be in on the ground floor of whatever new model is being built now. it will quickly announce and feel unnatural to them. what we would've so much want to be is in her 40s and having fully to adapt to the system that we never anticipated when starting out. the changes over the last 15 years have the sense that we are just at the beginning of them and not all of the signs seem very friendly to me. simon & schuster, which not long ago was getting into video but combinations, "vooks." it sounds at a a much more developed version of it. well, along with that, just edit a simon & schuster announced that it was aligning itself with the self-publishing venture. i would suggest that no publishing house, no matter how dire the times and no matter how much amazon would like to see all editors and all agents go way, should be part of this. because it brings us one step closer to a world without editors. what would be the world with many more elec
, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skill set and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and mathematical workers and our
and the wilderness. you talk about antietam and you talk about shiloh, manassas, all these battles people defending what they think, a way of life for slavery or what have you, all of that, all that bloodshed settle this contradiction. and we won. we have our country. and i like to go to gettysburg to say to my clerks, do we deserve this? do we deserve the sacrifice for the country that we have and are we living up to that? are we doing our part? >> just go anyplace. think of the people at the battle of the bulge or think of them at you know, during any war and just ask yourself, you know, let's assume without debating whether you should have had this, that, this war that, we have done our part and the thing i was told, was going to be a priest. that was really the only sort of goal that i had. what is a priest? you are called to do something. every ex-seminarian it's all nice like -- your call now is to do your part. to be able to earn the right to be here. >> you can mention in your book very prominently on the first page in the last page and i will mention it again, god. the declaration of indep
a bond company and they sold it to a bigger company. she went away into the wilderness. she's now founded her company again. >> she's men a plbeen a player while, significant in other own right. >> she's a remarkable woman. >> municipal bonds has everything to do with things we've been talking about in terms of financial health of the states, which is not great. you have to go state by state and make sure that you know what you're doing. you know, she's obviously the biggest proponent. i wish she'd start doing those commercials again. >> exactly. >> those things were so cool. iconic. >> they were. i love her. >> andy, you've come out with top picks from star investors. technology. >> these are, again, sort of out-of-the-box picks. align makes those invisible braces for your teeth. >> invisalign. >> i was thinking of getting those, yeah. >> and those things are really huge. pentair makes water filtration systems, obviously, you know, globally. that's an incredible business right now. water is a precious commodity. public storage is exactly what it sounds like, all those storage containers.
house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. and the more responsive it will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflect
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)